A chance to explore Ginkgo Petrified Forest

Print Article

  • Casey McCarthy/ Sun Tribune The trails in Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park give visitors the chance the explore the rolling hills beside the Columbia River.

  • 1

    Casey McCarthy/ Columbia Basin Herald The trails sit just a few miles off the highway beside the Columbia River.

  • 2

    Casey McCarthy/ Columbia Basin Herald In addtion to the petrified wood that can be seen along the trail, the Ginkgo Petrified Forest trails provide a glimpse fo the sagebrush and scattered rock that sparses the region.

  • 3

    Casey McCarthy/ Columbia Basin Herald The trails at Ginkgo Petrified Forest come in at 3 miles, with a highest point of 2,600 feet.

  • 4

    Casey McCarthy/ Columbia Basin Herald A view from atop one of the hills in the Ginkgo Petrified Forest give visitors a wide view around the area.

  • Casey McCarthy/ Sun Tribune The trails in Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park give visitors the chance the explore the rolling hills beside the Columbia River.

  • 1

    Casey McCarthy/ Columbia Basin Herald The trails sit just a few miles off the highway beside the Columbia River.

  • 2

    Casey McCarthy/ Columbia Basin Herald In addtion to the petrified wood that can be seen along the trail, the Ginkgo Petrified Forest trails provide a glimpse fo the sagebrush and scattered rock that sparses the region.

  • 3

    Casey McCarthy/ Columbia Basin Herald The trails at Ginkgo Petrified Forest come in at 3 miles, with a highest point of 2,600 feet.

  • 4

    Casey McCarthy/ Columbia Basin Herald A view from atop one of the hills in the Ginkgo Petrified Forest give visitors a wide view around the area.

VANTAGE — Just past the Columbia River off I-90 rests the Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park. The park presents a key stop for those interested in the Ice Age Floods that helped carve out the region.

A series of trails just a few miles from the highway exit provides visitors the chance the glimpse the rolling grass hills, and even get a glimpse of some of the petrified wood still present on the land.

The petrified wood was encased in lava, when magma flowed across the region, with much of the organic material being replaced mineral, preserving the wood in its place. As visitors walk along the trail, examples of the gingko, spruce, elm, walnut, and fir trees that once covered the region can be still be seen on the trailside.

A quick trip down the trail can be made to get a glimpse of the petrified historic artifacts. Those with a little more time can embark on the whole three-mile trip around the area to get a glimpse of the rolling hills overlooking the Columbia River, as well as the rocks and sagebrush that sparse the region.

As with many trails around the region, examples of the basalt columns can be seen with a quick trip up around the hills. With an elevation gain of 200 feet, according to the Washington Trails Association, hikers can reach a point of 2,600 feet on their way through the Ginkgo State Park.

In addition to the trails, new information panels were installed recently that give visitors a chance to learn a little bit more about the geological history that helped form the area we see today. A scenic view also resides just off the highway beside the Columbia River that provides visitors a great view of the waters below, as well as the sprawling hills and cliffside of the Basin that surround them.

Visitors to the trails are required to have the Discover Pass, and, as on most other trails in the region, should always be vigilant of western rattlesnakes on their trip.

Print Article

Read More

Big Bend CC agriculture program receives donation

August 14, 2019 at 5:00 am | Columbia Basin Herald MOSES LAKE — The agriculture program at Big Bend Community College will have an additional $2,000 for equipment for its brand-new plant and soil science lab. The “rural community grant” was awarded...

Comments

Read More

Legals August 14, 2019

August 14, 2019 at 5:00 am | OTHELLO CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Othello City Council will hold a public hearing to review a development agreement with Columbia Basin Health Association. Th...

Read More

Lewis Frank Johnson

August 13, 2019 at 8:57 pm | Columbia Basin Herald October 4, 1928 – August 6, 2019 Lewis Frank Johnson (Lew) was born on Oct. 4, 1928 in Bend, Oregon to Orval E. and Beulah Evelyn Jones Johnson. He spent his youth attending school in Bend and any f...

Comments

Read More

Othello gets new provisional officer

August 13, 2019 at 8:57 pm | The Royal Register OTHELLO — A new provisional officer was sworn-in at a regular Othello city council meeting on Monday. Isaiah Suarez was sworn-in by Mayor Shawn Logan. The 2009 Othello High School graduate worked ...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

509-765-4561
705 E. Hemlock (downstairs)
Othello, WA 99344

©2019 Sun Tribune Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X